When to add a page?

As someone relatively inexperienced in the working world (I’ve only been out of school for a couple of years), something I struggle with when writing my resume is deciding just how much information to put on there. The traditional wisdom is that a resume should be brief, and should fit on one page. Often when detailing the projects I’ve worked on, I end up pushing the boundaries of one page, especially when writing a ‘general’ resume that isn’t tailored to a specific position.

I know some people do two pages (one front, one back) for their resume. I’ve had some people tell me that I should do the same, while others warn that I shouldn’t!

I want to hear what you guys have to say. How many pages is your resume? Why?

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Hey Philippe, Nick from Talent Support jumping in here. Typically you want to keep your resume to one page, just the front. I think it’s definitely a good idea to come up with a general resume template that you can use, and that could be longer than one page. However, when it comes to submitting your resume, it’s almost always a good decision to do even minor tailoring to the position you’re applying for. If you can take that ‘general’ resume and even just cut off a few things that don’t seem the most applicable, you’ll make sure whoever is reading your resume gets only the most important/pertinent info, that’s what they’ll be looking for.

In terms of when it’s okay to have two pages, in my experience, it’s typically two cases. The first, is if you’re someone with a ton of years of experience in your field, and it would be a disservice to your longevity to leave too much out. The second case is if you have a good deal of relevant experience, and you’re being referred to the application. If you’re outside the general pool of applicants, there’s a better chance a recruiter will take a bit more time to examine your application fully (but still try to stick to no more than two pages.)

Hope that helps but ask more follow up questions if you want!

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